Lowen Systems: Dynamic Manual Interface

Course Descriptions

 

 

Class Descriptions:

CORE CONCEPTS AND SKILLS (SK1)

This class was designed to introduce students to Lowen Systems Dynamic Manual Interface (DMI), a safe, gentle and highly efficient method of helping clientele toward optimal health. In Core Concepts, practitioners learn how to interact with the wisdom of the client’s body through the unique way in which the hands are used in this modality. In most Manual Therapies, the hands introduce pressure or forces into the body. In DMI, the hands remain completely relaxed, neutral and soft. By getting a mental picture of the tissue that is being assessed, including its qualities and how deep it is in the body, one can make very specific contact with that tissue.  Instead of pressing in to work on the area, students learn to keep the contact while pulling out slightly.  This allows one to both assess the tissue and to follow the subtle patterns of movement that occur when tensions are being redistributed during a correction.

Practitioners receive treatment and evaluation tools they can immediately integrate into their practices. Techniques from several classes are offered so students can get a feel for this work and objectively determine whether or not they wish to pursue further studies in DMI.

There are two versions of this class, a 2 day and a 3 day class.  The 2 day class teaches the hand skills necessary for successful participation in the basic classes and a sampling of skills and techniques from our different classes.  We also teach cranial mapping, one of our basic assessment tools. The 3 day classes include the aforementioned as well as concepts and terminology that is part of the greater field of manual therapy as well as anatomy and physiology specific to our introductory and intermediate courses and an introduction to the way that Lowen Systems looks at Biomechanics.

Class Prerequisites: None. Familial or self-care providers, Yoga practitioners, or clients may take this class

Core Concepts and Skills is a Required Class for all our classes.  For students with an exceptional background in light touch manual therapy, there will be some classes which combine Core and Essential Elements 1 classes.

Recommended for all potential students, interested clients or family members, yoga teachers.

Learning Outcomes

Students will demonstrate the ability to:

1.  Locate topographical anatomical landmarks of musculoskeletal, neural and circulatory systems.  (3 day)

2.  Manually locate and engage major organs of the body.

3.  Understand and describe positional evaluations from medical professionals regarding the spine and

     sacrum in standard biomechanical terminology.  (3 day)

4.  Perceive subtle tensions in the hand to use for assessment purposes.

5.  Explore engaging structures at a physical energetic interface during manual treatment.

6.  Demonstrate an understanding of concepts required in the study of Lowen Systems courses.

 

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3.0 hours theory, .5 hours lab)

Lecture:  Introduction and overview

Lecture:  Theory of Lowen Systems

Lecture and Demonstration:  History and development

Lecture and Demonstration:  Terminology referenced in this and related therapies

Lab:  Engaging tissues at a depth

Break

Lab: Key Experiences: Neutral, interface, listen, follow

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00- 5:00 (1.0 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture and Demonstration:  Manual Perception theory – the organ map on hand

Lab:  Topographical location of the viscera

Break

Lecture and Demonstration:  Use of Hormonal Axis map for organ location

Lecture, Demonstration and Lab:  Corrective Activity

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Lab: Treatment with reflexes for motility

Lecture and Demonstration: Cranial Map

Lecture and Lab: Cranial map for Spine

Day Two: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture and Lab: Cranial map to find and treat related areas.

Lab:  Assessment of local spinal biomechanics, utilizing Cranial Map (Manual Perception), most

sensitive areas (Manual Perception).

Lecture and Demonstration:  Introduction to Biomechanical Regulators

Lab:  Biomechanical Regulator – spinal sidebending

Review, questions and answers

 

Three Day Class- Third Day

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstration:  Movement Planes

Lecture: Biomechanical Terminology and Theory

Break

Lecture and Lab:  Fryette’s Laws, Rule of Convexity and Concavity, rule of 3’s

Lecture and Lab: topical anatomy- viscera

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (2 hours theory. 1 hour lab)

Lecture and Lab: Palpation Thorax, Spine, Sacrum and Pelvis

Lecture, Demonstration and Lab:  Circulatory system anatomy

Break

Lecture, Demonstration and Lab:  Neural anatomy

Review, questions and answers

 

Total: 10.5 hours theory and concepts, 9 hours lab and skills: 19.5 contact hours,

2 day class is 13 contact hours

 

 

CONNECTIVE TISSUE SERIES presents an entirely new model for the treatment and management of connective tissue restrictions and imbalances, presented in this series of workshops

CONNECTIVE TISSUE FOUNDATIONS (Formerly Fascial Regulators 1 and 2 or FR1 and 2)

Connective Tissue Foundations is the first level of Connective Tissue Regulators and also can be taken as an entry level class. Students learn to assess and modify restrictions in soft tissues including fascia, ligaments, tendons, joint capsules and muscles. Frank Lowen discovered areas of the body which have a specific organization around a main axis of continual movement. Each area corresponds to a different connective tissue. When properly engaged with a restriction in the connective tissue that it regulates,   these “regulators”   make surprisingly rapid changes in tissue tensions. These techniques make large changes in range of motion, movement quality and pain level. All Manual Therapists will easily use these techniques for fast, easy relief of client symptoms.

Connective Tissue Foundations provides the framework for the Connective Tissue Series and is a prerequisite for all other levels (Connective Tissue Series: Advanced Connective Tissue).

Class Prerequisites: None. Core Concepts and Skills recommended. Familial or self-care providers or clients with major health issues may take this class

Connective Tissue Foundations is a Required Class for Advanced Connective Tissue, Hand Skills/Practical Integration and Training Intensives.  It is highly recommended for Fluid Pressure Dynamics Visceral.

Recommended for: All interested students with license to touch and Yoga teachers.  It is a Foundations class required for Foundations Certification.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to demonstrate:

1.  Locating the regulator for the fascial system.

2.  Use of the regulator to determine the site of the most significant fascial tension.

3.  Use of the movement of the regulator to create changes in range of motion by affecting the tensions within the fascial system.

4.  Locate the representations of the regulators for evaluation of tendons, ligaments and myofascial units.

5.  Generate measurable changes in tendon, ligaments, joint capsules and muscle units utilizing the fulcra.

 

 

 

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.5 hours theory, 1.0 hours lab)

Lecture:  Historical perspective of techniques and theory

Lecture:  New theories regarding connective tissue properties

Lab:  Hand Skills

Demonstrations

Introduction of Regulator

Lab:  Vertical Arm, Tracing Homunculus

Lunch 12:30-1:30

Day One:  p.m. 1:30- 5:00 (2 hours theory, 1.5 hour lab)

Lecture and Demonstration:  Introduction of Main Fascial Fulcrum

Lab:  Evaluation of fascial restrictions utilizing fascial “Homunculus”

Break

Lecture and Demonstration:  Basic Treatment

Lab:  Finding and treating fascial tensions- simple form

       Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstration:  Review of evaluation and simple form treatment.

Lecture and demonstration: Using vertical movement at fulcra to enhance treatment effect.

Lab: Enhanced treatment.

Break

Lecture and Demonstration:  Using positioning to enhance treatment, and minor regulators

Lab:  Treatment with positioning and minor regulators.

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  p.m.  1:30-5:00 (2 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review of Fascial Regulators 1

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Theories of connective tissue

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Evaluation technique for ligaments

Lab: Palpation of ligamentous homunculus

Lecture and Demonstrations: Treatment techniques for ligaments

Lab:  Assessment and treatment of ligament tension.

Review, questions and answers

Lunch 12:30 – 1:30

 

Day Three:  a.m. 9:00 – 12:30 (2 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Identification of tendon representation site

Lecture:  Evaluation techniques for tendons

Demonstration and Lab: Tendon treatment

Break

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Treatment for tendons, utilizing fulcra and regulators

Lunch 12:30 – 2:00

 

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00 – 5:00 (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture and Demonstration:  Joint Capsule Homunculus

Lab: Outline Homunculus, assess and treat joint capsule

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Evaluation of restrictions within a myofascial unit

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Treatment of myofascial units

Review, questions and Answers

Total:  12.5 hours theory and concepts, 7 hours lab and skills:  19.5 contact hours, allowing for breaks.

 

ADVANCED CONNECTIVE TISSUE (ACT)

Students build on the model of Connective Tissue Regulators to include more specific assessment and treatment of connective tissues and the systems that influence tensions and tone. New Regulators are explored and practitioners are encouraged to work from the center of the body outward; if we can help change the core, often other issues will resolve themselves.  New Regulators introduced include those which help change the most intrinsic muscles, core muscles (integrators), oblique fibers and movements, peripheral stabilizers, smooth muscles, membranes, heart (connective tissue), fascia of the spine, cranial and spinal dura, and other more specific soft tissues. The movements in this class are more diffuse and specific than those from the Connective Tissue Foundations class, but are much more powerful tools for fast changes.

Class Prerequisites: Connective Tissue Foundations (or FR1 and FR2) and Core Concepts.

Advanced Connective Tissue is recommended for therapists treating orthopedic and neurological problems, Athletic Trainers and is highly recommended before taking BMRLE and FPDV.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Trace seven homunculi for muscles.
  2. Utilize regulators to normalize tissue tensions in intrinsic muscles, core stabilizer muscles and other functional muscle groups with measurable changes in ROM.
  3. Utilize regulators to membranes to make a measurable difference in active respiration.

 

 

Day One:  a.m. 9:00 – 12:30 (2 1/2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Review Foundations material

Lecture: Energetic systems and Homunculi

Lab: Hand Skills

Lecture: Functional Groups of Muscles

Lecture: Organization of Regulators

Lab: Location of Intrinsic Muscle regulator

Lunch 12:30 – 2:00

Day One:  p.m. – 2:00 – 5:00 (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture:  Evaluation and treatment with Intrinsic muscle regulator

Lab: Intrinsics

Lecture:  Core Integrators- Anatomy and kinesiology

Lab: Core Integrators

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00 – 12:30 (2 hours theory, 1 1/2 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Muscles and Connective tissue for stability

Lab: Location of Homunculi for these tissues.

Demo and Lab: treatment of muscles and tissues of stability off the main axis

Lunch 12:30 – 2:00

Day Two:  p.m. 2:00 – 5:00 (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture: Smooth muscles and smooth muscle control. Influence of Autonomic Nervous System and hormonal system.

Lecture:  Regulation of smooth muscle tone assisted by homunculus.

Lab: Smooth muscles of lower digestive tract.

Review, questions and Answers

Day Three:  a.m. 9:00 – 12:30 (2 hours theory, 1 1/2 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture:  Anatomy membranes in thoracic, abdominal and pelvic cavities.

Lab: Assisting with tensions in membranes.

Lecture: Deeper layers of fascia and dura.

Lab: Deeper layers of fascia

Lunch 12:30 – 2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00 – 5:00 (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture: Full evaluation and treatment using the regulator system.

Lab: Integration of treatment utilizing regulator system and work from other classes

Lecture: Functional Application and use with other systems of therapy

Review, questions and Answers

 

Total:   12.5 hours theory and concepts,    7 hours lab and skills:   19.5 contact hours.

 

 

PRACTICUM (P)

Students may select from a one-day or two-day practicum in Spokane.  The format is flexible- usually two therapists participate, but 3-4 is also possible.  This is essentially tutoring of course material tailored to the individual needs of the participants, including learning styles, and individual practice.  Students may request any focus, but this should be agreed by the other participants. Students who are interested in pursuing teacher track will have a more formal training, going over the material from all the basic and intermediate classes as well as hand skills.

Class Prerequisites: At least one Lowen Systems course

Two Full Days of Practica are Required for Teacher Tract

Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate the ability to:

  • Improve evaluation and palpation skills under the supervision of an advanced practitioner;
  • Integrate the classes they have successfully completed into a comprehensive therapeutic session;
  • Better understand the philosophy and theory of this work;
  • Improve their understanding of the work and hand skills and apply these skills into their individual practice.
  •   The BOC of NATA has approved this class for CEUs.

 

BIOMECHANICAL REGULATOR SERIES A Regulator is a precise point that can be engaged mechanically and energetically to improve an action, motility or movement in a corresponding structure or interface. Biomechanical Regulators work at the interface of the joint, improving the arthrokinematics, as well as restoring balance and space to the joint.

BIOMECHANICAL REGULATORS: FOUNDATIONS (BMR)

There are very few clients do not have painful biomechanical issues related to the spine, pelvis and sacrum. This course addresses specific and detailed components of all three. By using body positioning to take the joint to a soft barrier, small rhythms in specific areas (regulators) are facilitated to help make immediate (and painless) changes in the joint. By making an assessment (and measurements) before treatment and again after, immediate changes in range of motion, movement patterns and gait can be observed and experienced. Space and balance within a joint can be re-established, altering conditions that commonly arise from chronic joint compression. Even complex issues involving biomechanics are easily assessed and treated with these original techniques. The fantastic and generous labs in this class which address the spine, pelvis and sacrum leave most students feeling the tremendous benefits of treatment with these techniques and anxious to apply their new skills to their practices.

Class Prerequisites: Core Concepts recommended

Biomechanical Regulators: Foundations is a Required Class for Biomechanical Regulators: Lower Extremities, Hand Skills/Practical Integration,  Physical/Energetic Interface: Neuro Level 2 and Circulation 1.

 

Biomechanical Regulators is recommended for all therapist treating the spine and pelvis and may be taken as a first class by those with a strong background in biomechanics, including the sacrum and pelvis.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

1.  Locate a regulator specific to a movement at a particular joint, given the approximate location.

2.  Manually test for movement restrictions in the pelvis, sacrum and spine.

3.  Identify which components of a movement should be addressed.

4.  Palpate the movement of a regulator while tension on the area being treated is engaged.

5.  Physically engage a joint at a soft barrier while engaging a regulator to help achieve increased motion.

6.  Assess pre- and post-treatment changes in movement and ambulation.

 

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3.0 hours theory, .5 hours lab)

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Introduction and overview

Lab: Palpation exercise

Break

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Biomechanics of the hip

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00- 5:00 (1.0 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Lab:  Regulators for the hip joint

Lecture, Demonstration and Lab:  Rotation, anterior/posterior glide, vertical glide and

circumduction at the hip

Break

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstration:  Biomechanics of the pelvis

Lab:  Using the regulators for the pelvis

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Two: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture and Demonstration:  Spinal Biomechanics

Lab:  Regulators for the spine

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Sacral biomechanics, regulators for vertical, horizontal and oblique

axes of motion

Break

Lab:  Vertical, horizontal and oblique axes of sacral motion

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.5 hours theory. 1.5 hour lab)

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Tensional patterns within the sacrum itself

Break

Lecture and lab: Regulators for the sacrum and coccyx

Review, questions and answers

Total  10 hours theory, 9.5 hours lab for 19.5 credit hours

Biomechanical Regulators: Lower Extremeties (BMRLE)

This class introduces additional regulators for the knee, ankle, foot and hip. The main focus of this course, however, is the study of a new model for movement analysis. This is based on the discovery of a complex pattern of movement that exists independently of volitional movement, a function of the autonomic nervous system. Interaction with and balancing this underlying pattern has a profound effect on gait, joint motion and pain. The results of treatment using this new approach have been phenomenal, according to past participants.

Class Prerequisites: Core Concepts, Biomechanical Regulators: Foundations and Manual Perception 1

Biomechanical Regulators: Lower Extremities is a Required Class for Physical/Energetic Interface: Neuro 2 and Training Intensives.

Biomechanical Regulators Lower Extremities is recommended for therapists who treat movement and gait or are wishing to incorporate biomechanical assessment and treatment into their practices.

 

 Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

1.  Locate Biomechanical Regulators for the lower extremities.

2.  Identify the stages of the gait cycle with diagram.

3.  Identify component movements associated with gait cycle phases.

4.  Feel autonomic nervous system motilities in key places.

5.  Effect changes in range of motion and movement utilizing reflexes.

 

OUTLINE

Day One: a.m. 9:00-12:00 (2 hours theory and concepts, 1 hour lab and skills)

Review of Biomechanical Regulators:  Foundations

Lecture:  Review of regulators

Lecture and Demonstration:  Gait cycle

Lab:  Experiential Exercises

Lunch 12:00-1:30 Lunch

Day One:  p.m. 1:30-5:00 (2 hours theory and concepts, 1 ½ hours lab and skills)

Lecture:  Rhythms and symmetrical/asymmetrical patterns

Lab:  Palpation of tissues and rhythms

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two: a.m. 9:00 – 12:30 (2 hours theory and concepts, 1 ½ hours lab and skills)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Regulators of hip

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Regulators of femur

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Regulators of tibia

Labs:  Regulators of the hip, femur and tibia

Lunch:  12:30 – 2:00

Day Two:  p.m. 2:00 – 5:00 (2 hours theory and concepts, 1 hour lab and skills)

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Biomechanics of the foot

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Regulators of the foot

Lab:  Regulators of the foot

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three:  a.m. 9:00 – 12:30 (2.5 hours theory and concepts, 1 hour lab and skills)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Autonomic movement patterns

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Tracking autonomic impulses

Lab:  Tracking autonomic impulses

Lunch:  12:30 – 2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00 – 5:00 (1.5 hours theory and concepts, 1.5 hours lab and skills)

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Autonomic control of foot movements

Lab:  Utilizing autonomic impulses

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Four:  a.m.9:00 – 12:30 (2 hours theory and concepts, 1.5 hours lab and skills)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Visceral considerations and treatment

Lab:  Visceral considerations

Lecture and Demonstration:  Comprehensive treatment

Lunch:  12:30 – 2:00

Day Four:  p.m. 2:00 – 5:00 (1.5 hours theory and concepts, 1.5 hours lab and skills)

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Comprehensive evaluation of lower extremities

Lab:  Comprehensive treatment

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Home programs and exercises

Integration

                 Review, questions and answers

 

 

ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS: Integrated studies of the foundations of Dynamic Manual Interface, these classes are designed to accelerate the study of Lowen Systems work. Theory and skills from Manual Perception, Connective Tissue Regulators and Biomechanical Regulators are introduced in the first level class, which is a prerequisite for subsequent classes.  There is a Body Systems track and a Biomechanics track.  This will enable students with a particular focus to concentrate on their field while progressing to more advanced classes.

Essential Elements I: This class teaches the theories and skills of our most utilized material, which can be readily applied to virtually any practice. This includes the cranial map, connective tissue regulators for fascia and ligaments, basic Manual Perception skills including determination of which system is involved for a particular tissue problem, and the Biomechanical Regulators which are used most frequently throughout this system of work. This material applies to any population. In order to maximize learning of these diverse skills, students will be required to read material regarding these concepts prior to attending this class.

Class Prerequisites: Core Concepts 2 day class.

Essential Elements I is a Required Class for all other Lowen Systems Classes

Essential Elements I is recommended for all client populations and all manual therapy practitioners.

Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

1.  Utilize Cranial Mapping to locate a problem area in the body.

2.  Utilize Manual Perception to assess dominant system influence in an area.

3.  Utilize the Fascial Regulatory to locate a focus of tension in the body and to make a change in this tension pattern.

4.  Locate and follow the activity of a Biomechanical Regulator.

5.  Make a change in joint mobility using Biomechanical Regulators.

 

Essential Elements 1

Please note that time for the 3 day class adds up to 19 hours, and allows for 5 minute a.m. and p.m. breaks.  The breakdown here is a guideline.  Some groups prefer to have longer breaks and shorter lunches, depending on proximity of eating establishments.  Some groups prefer the option of an early start and/or shorter lunch on the final day of the course to allow for travel time.

 

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3.0 hours theory, .5 hours lab)

Lecture:  Introduction and overview

Lecture:  Review of required readings.

Lecture and Lab:  Cranial Map

Break

Lecture and Lab: Engagement for assessment and treatment.

Lecture, Demonstrations:  The hand lines

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lab: Hand Lines

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Assessment and treatment with cranial map and hand lines

Break

Lecture, Demonstration and Lab: one handed techniques for tissue tension.

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Fascial Homunculus location

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Using Fascial Homunculus for assessment

Break

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Treatment with Fascial Regulator

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Two: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  More complex treatment with Fascial Regulator

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Ligament Homunculus location.

Break

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Ligament Homunculus for assessment and treatment.

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab: Biomechanical Regulators

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Spine review from Core.

Lecture, Demonstration and lab:  Vertical Correction of Ilium

Break

Lecture, Demo, Lab: Ilium off sacrum and sacrum off ilium techniques

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs:  Inferior fibula.

Lecture, Demo, Lab: Inferior sacrum

Lecture, Demo, Lab: compression of femoral head.

Review, questions and answers

 

Total: 10.5 hours theory and concepts, 9 hours lab and skills: 19.5 contact hours

 

ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS II BODY SYSTEMS

Essential Elements II is derived from several classes to facilitate preparation to advanced classes.  It includes material from Manual Perception 1, Manual Perception 2, Neuro, Circulation, Advanced Connective Tissue, Neuro 2 and a technique for tissue disruption that was originally presented in the BMR class. This class serves as a prerequisite for advanced classes with Frank including Cranial and Visceral courses.  There will be required readings in preparation for this fast paced class.

 

PREREQUISITES:

Core Concepts and Skills, Essential Elements 1 or Manual Perception 1, Connective Tissue Foundations and Biomechanical Regulators.

 

 

Essential Elements II Body Systems

Please note that time for the 3 day class adds up to 19.5 hours, and allows for 5 minute a.m. and p.m. breaks.  The breakdown here is a guideline.  Some groups prefer to have longer breaks and shorter lunches, depending on proximity of eating establishments.  Some groups prefer the option of an early start and/or shorter lunch on the final day of the course to allow for travel time.

 

OBJECTIVES:

 

Students will be able to:

1)       Locate and treat scar tissue

2)       Distinguish contributing factors to tissue problems in terms of tissue type and system.

3)       Assess and interact therapeutically with flow problems in the circulatory systems: general, pulmonary and portal.

4)       Utilize reflexes that assist with normalization of tissue tone.

5)       Locate and interact with neural structures using fulcra and reflex points to assist.

6)       Interact specifically with membranes of the cavities using reflexive areas.

7)       Distinguish and interact with tensions in the meninges.

8)       Utilize reflexive activities in the sympathetic and parasympathetic system to assist with tissue integrity.

9)       Explore the cognitive and neural issue related to connective tissue dysfunction.

 

OUTLINE:             10 hours lecture, 9 ½ hour lab

           

Day One: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2 hours lecture, 1 ½ hours lab)

            Introduction: lecture

Manual Perception Neuro lecture, demo and lab

Manual Perception Circulatory Lecture Lab and Demo

Break

Manual Perception Immune and Hormonal: Lecture, lab and demo.

 

Lunch break

 

Day One p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1 ½ hour lecture 1 ½ hour lab)

Manual Perception Scar Tissue Lecture and Lab

Manual Perception Neural aspects of Connective Tissue Lecture and Lab

Questions and Answers preview for Day 2

 

Day Two: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1 ½ hour lecture, 2 hour lab)

Circulatory anatomy review

Heart palpation and Lab

Pulmonary system lecture and lab

Break

Portal System lecture and lab

 

Lunch

 

Day Two p.m. 2:00- 5:00 (1 ½ hour lecture, 1 1/2 hour lab)

Neurovascular reflexes lecture and lab

Cranial Sinus review

Straight sinus reflex lecture and lab

Neural review

Questions and answers, preview day 3

 

Day Three a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2 hours lecture, 1 ½ hour lab)

Neural Fulcra lecture and lab

Facial points for neural structures lecture and lab

Break

Sympathetic and Parasympathetic 6 point technique

Questions and Answers

Lunch

 

Day Three p.m. 1:30- 4:30 (1 ½ hour lecture, 1 ½ hour lab)

Connective Tissue Regulators Lecture: Theory and scope

Advanced Connective Tissue Membranes of the cavities Lecture and Lab

Meninges of the brain and spine, lecture and lab.

Questions, answers, summation

 

 

MANUAL PERCEPTION SERIES These courses present a new and unique way to evaluate and interact with multiple systems of the body. The hand is used as a fine instrument, with each area of the hand representing a specific tissue, system or characteristic.

Manual Perception 1 (MP1)

An entirely new and original field of assessment and related treatment is offered, which is instrumental to the more advanced levels of Lowen Systems Dynamic Manual Interface. The hand is trained as a tool to be used to seek and interpret information from the client’s body and to assist in engaging optimal corrective activity. Tension is perceived to collect in the therapist’s hand at different areas that correspond to tissues or systems within the body, both separately and in relationship to each other. These tensions can be specifically engaged to explore the influences of other systems and to treat the tissue or system. Manual Perception 1 includes Neural, Circulatory, Hormonal and Immune systems. The Cranial Map is  also  taught in more detail and is a vital assessment tool that is utilized in much of our work

Class Prerequisites: Core Concepts

Manual Perception 1 is a Required Class for Manual Perception 2, Physical/Energetic Interface: Neuro 1, Neuro 2 and Circulation 1, Hand Skills/Practical Integration and the Mentorship Program, as well as the Advanced Fluid Pressure Dynamics classes.

Manual Perception 1 is recommended for all therapists interested in Lowen Systems work with any caseload, and is especially useful for those who have limited hands-on time for manual intervention in their practices.

Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

1.  Utilize Cranial Mapping to locate a problem in the body.

2.  Utilize Cranial Mapping to locate and describe a restriction.

3.  Engage two body areas at a physical/energetic interface.

4.  Assess neural influence, circulatory influence and hormonal influence related to a problem area.

5.  Explore the potential of the hand as a tool to aid in distinguishing types of tissue involved and engage those tissues for treatment.

Manual Perception 1

Please note that time adds up to 19 hours, and allows for 5 minute a.m. and p.m. breaks.  The breakdown here is a guideline.  Some groups prefer to have longer breaks and shorter lunches, depending on proximity of eating establishments.  Some groups prefer the option of an early start and/or shorter lunch on the final day of the course to allow for travel time.

 

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3.0 hours theory, .5 hours lab)

Lecture:  Introduction and overview

Lecture:  Theory of Lowen Systems

Lecture and Demonstrations:  History and development

Lecture:  Terminology referenced in this and related therapies

Lab:  Engaging tissues at a depth and feeling tensions in the hand

Break

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Cranial mapping

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Most sensitive area for motion in planes

Lab:  Cranial mapping for viscera and spine

Lab:  Assessing spinal problems using cranial map and most sensitive areas

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Manual Perception Theory – The neural line

Lab:  Feeling correlation of four major areas

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Balancing neural-based tensions with Manual Perception

approach

Break

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Dura and neuropeptides

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Tendons and muscles

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Circulatory line

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  The heart on the neural line, atria ventricles, A/V folds and

valves

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  The main vessels

Break

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Peripheral vessels

Lab:  Venous/Arterial flow in the circulatory line

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Two: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Lymph nodes and vessels

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Pressure related tensions

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  SA/AV nodes and conductivity

Break

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Synapses and neurotransmitters

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Immune aspects of spleen and thymus

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Hormones

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  The hormonal axis

Lecture and Demonstration:  The organ map

Lab:  Organ identification with the organ map

Break

Lab:  Assisting the body’s simple hormonal issue with manual perception

Lecture and Demonstration:  Triangulation to determine more complex relationships

Lab:  Demonstration and treatment

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs:  Special hand relationships:  soft tissue, connective tissue,

inflow/outflow, etc.

Lab:  Comprehensive treatment

Review, questions and answers

 

Total: 10.5 hours theory and concepts, 9 hours lab and skills: 19 contact hours

 

Manual Perception 2 (MP2)

More complex patterns are explored, including higher-level cognitive influences on specific tissues. The connective tissue system is presented in detail. Differential assessment and treatment of structures, including tendons, ligaments, joint capsules, bone vasculature and layers of bone are part of this exciting class. There is also an incredible, simple technique which has a tremendous effect on scar tissue.

Class Prerequisites: Core Concepts and Manual Perception 1

Manual Perception 2 is a recommended class for the Mentorship Program.

Manual Perception 2 is recommended for practitioners who treat a varied caseload, athletic injuries, connective tissue/orthopedic problems, and patients with a lot of scar tissue.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

1.  Palpate a connection between cognitive influences and certain connective tissues.

2.  Locate and help influence structures related to bone.

3.  Utilize reflexive associations to facilitate correction of connective tissue tensions.

4.  Integrate this material with that of other Lowen Systems classes.

 

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3.0 hours theory, .5 hours lab)

Lecture:Review Of MP 1, introduction to MP2

Demo: MP2 applied

Break

Lab: Hand Skills

Lecture: Muscle, tendons, visceral ligaments, smooth muscle

Lab: Connective tissue: muscle, smooth muscle, tendon, visceral ligaments

Lunch 12:30- 2:00

Day One: p.m.

                Review, questions and answers

Scar Tissue Lecture and Lab

Facilitated Segment ad Sympathetic facilitation lecture and lab

Break

Tissues that are tension-reactive: Lecture, demo and Lab.

Review

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review Day one

Lecture and demonstration- cognitive components of tendons and ligaments

Lab

BreaK

Lecture: Bursae

Lab: bursae

Lecture: other connective tissue

Lab: Sharpey;s fibers and other connective tissue

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Two: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture: Articular structures: menisci, synovium, cartilage, tendon sheath, periarticular and hyaline cartilage.

Lab: Joint structures, treatment of the knee.

Review

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Anatomy of bone, specific structures

Vasculature to the bone

Break

Continuation of bone anatomy and vasculature and demonstration

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Comprehensive Lab: periosteum, Haversian canals, Volkmann, canals, medullary cavity, vascular to bone, cortical bone and trabeculae.

Review, questions and answers

 

Total: 10.5 hours theory and concepts, 9 hours lab and skills: 19.5 contact hours

 

 

HAND SKILLS/PRACTICAL INTEGRATION This material explores detailed use of hands for both. evaluation and treatment. It is required for Foundations Certification in Dynamic Manual Interface.

19.5 credit hours. Students are exposed to further development of the hand – the instrument that we use in Manual Therapy, specific to techniques that are taught within Lowen Systems classes. This class involves exercises that enhance our ability to discern with palpation skills in evaluation and to interact with in treatment. More importantly, students learn how to integrate the material they have learned in the other basic classes into a sophisticated approach to assessment and treatment. This class is required for Foundations Certification.  Part of this class is focused on the theory of this work and how to explain and articulate the treatment approach to patients, their families, and other professionals.  We work on problem solving for diverse and complex patients.

If certification is desired, it is required students complete a written test and a practical assessment by the instructor.

Class Prerequisites: Fascial Regulators 1 and 2 (Connective Tissue Series: Foundation), Core Concepts, Manual Perception 1 and Biomechanical Regulators: Foundations

Hand Skills/Practical Integration is a Required Class for Teaching Tract and for Foundations Certification.

Hand Skills/Practical Integration is recommended for practitioners who are interested in communicating about this work with their clients and other practitioners and with students who would like to continue in the studies of Lowen Systems and integrate this work at a higher level. We consider this class to be a very important part of the curriculum.

Learning Outcomes : Students will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Determine dominance of sensory or motor problem in a target tissue based on pattern of hand tension.
  2. Obtain more detail from cranial map utilizing new material from this workshop;
  3. Narrate a simple treatment, and demonstrate observable change.

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3.0 hours theory, .5 hours lab)

Lecture:  Introduction and objectives

Lab: Engagement Exercises

Lecture: New ways to use Cranial map

Lab: Cranial Map Advanced Usage

Lecture and Lab: Advanced view of Manual Perception

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture and Demonstrations:

Review of Connective Tissue Regulators and Dynamic Application

Lab: Connective Tissue Regulators

Lecture and Demonstrations Main Reference Areas for evaluation and treatment planning

Lab: Main reference areas and Manual Perception Triangulation

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Advanced Concepts in BMR Foundations., Integration with MP and CTR.

Demo and Lab: Dynamic assessment and treatment using MP at Biomechanical Barriers

Demo and Lab: Combined Treatment MP, CTF, BMR

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Two: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture: The language of Lowen Systems; communicating with peers, patients, medical personnel and families.

Group Activities: Theoretical Case Studies

Role Playing and problem solving with group facilitation

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Combined treatment with groups of 3 (role-playing and treatment)

Lab:  Skill Assessment for Certification

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs: Combined Treatment: groups of 3 continued.  Objective stated and demonstrated.

Skill tune-up and re-assessment for recertification

Written and oral examination for certification

Review, questions and answers

 

Total: 10.5 hours theory and concepts, 9 hours lab and skills: 19.5 contact hours

 

 

PHYSICAL/ENERGETIC INTERFACE SERIES This material was formerly presented as Therapeutic Horizons. While Therapeutic Horizons was a collaborative effort, the initial material was based on Frank Lowen’s findings.  Some of the original insights, which spurred the development of the Therapeutic Horizons curriculum, have continued to develop and grow into new and expanding bodies of knowledge. Those who have observed Frank in action know that while he is always finding new phenomena, he always includes material from the original Brain course (BANM) in his treatments, both the physical and energetic aspects.

Physical/Energetic Interface: Neuro 1 (NEURO1)

26 Credit hours. All clients can benefit from techniques taught in Neuro 1, whether suffering from an orthopedic or neurological condition. Neuro 1 covers techniques and concepts for working with the central nervous system, including working with movements and reflexes to affect circulation and dural motility. Original models are presented for treatment of spinal mechanics and regulatory mechanisms that facilitate change in the central nervous system via systemic relationships. Lowen Systems Dynamic Manual Interface is a very safe modality for all bodyworkers and most clients, as it encourages the practitioner to interact with the wisdom of their client’s body. Techniques are designed to assist the natural tissue rhythms in that individual, whether they are associated with fascial, muscular, visceral, osseous, nervous or circulatory tissues.

Tissues treated by these techniques include the bones of the cranium, dura of cranium and spinal cord, spinal discs, ligaments and vasculature to the spine, and vasculature to the cranium via the musculature tone of the vessel walls.  Energetic aspects are also explored in this fascinating class.

Class Prerequisites: Core Concepts and Manual Perception 1

Physical/Energetic Interface: Neuro 1 is a Required Class for Physical/Energetic Interface: Neuro 2 and the Fluid Pressure Dynamics :Cranial.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

1.  Manually follow neural and dural motility.

2.  Use neural motilities therapeutically.

3.  Locate the sites of Neurovascular reflexes and use neurovascular reflexes to facilitate flow.

4.  Expand the view of spinal mechanics to include visceral, ligamentous and myofascial relationships.

5.  Work with the cranial map as an assessment tool for components of spinal mechanics.

6.  Interact specifically with tissues supporting the spine to facilitate decompression and increased mobility.

 

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3.0 hours theory, .5 hours lab)

Review of central nervous system anatomy

Lecture and Demonstrations:  The cranial map

Break

Lab:  The cranial map

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Introduction to neural motility

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00- 5:00 (1.0 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Various aspects of neural motility, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital

lobes

Lab:  Neural motility, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital lobes

Break

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Dural motility and introduction to reflexes affecting dura

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Reflexes at the posterior cranium: inion reflexes, dural, neural and vascular

reflexes

Break

Lab:  Inion reflexes, dural, neural and vascular reflexes

Lunch  12:30 – 2:00

Day Two p.m. (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Components of the spine and interacting with these tissues for spinal

decompression

Lab: Spinal Decompression

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Spinal mechanics

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Vertebral disks and systemic tissue relationships

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Vertebral facets and systemic tissue relationships

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Vertebral transverse processes and systemic tissue relationships

Break

Lab:  Integrating labs from the morning

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (2 hours theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Energetic relationships

Lab:  Energetic relationships

Break

Lecture and Demonstrations: Location and motilities of deeper structures

Lab:  Midbrain and brainstem structure location via landmarks and motility

Lecture: Visceral relationship with neural motilities

Lab:  Visceral relationship with neural motilities

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Four: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2 hours theory. 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Sensory and motor cortex; flow and blockage

Lab:  Facilitating flow

Break

Lecture:  Cognitive Dynamics:  East meets West

Lecture:  Limbic System

Lab:  Emotions and effect on tissues.  Monitoring movement in limbic system

Lunch 12:30- 2:00

Day Four: p.m. 2:00- 5:00 (2 hour theory, 1 hour lab)

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Review and integration

Lab:  Integrating the material

Review, questions and answers

 

Total: 15.5 hours theory and concepts, 9.5 hours lab and skills: 26 contact hours

 

Physical/Energetic Interface: Neuro 2

26 Credit hours. Students learn functional application of techniques that are based on a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the spine, midbrain and brain stem, and a moderately good understanding of the neurophysiology of these structures. Using reflexes and hand engagement to discern blockages and facilitate flow, students learn to assist in the process of recovery from back and neck pain and stiffness. Those with more of a medical background can apply these techniques to a variety of injuries and diagnoses. Students gain insight to interacting with clients with pain, decreased movement and function involving their nervous systems via gentle techniques that utilize self-corrective movements. These techniques are applicable to a wide population, from those with sports injuries, postural problems, and minor complaints and stiffness to those who are significantly incapacitated. Students are required to work within the restraints of their license and training.

This class includes sacral reflexes and cranial reflexes that effect tensions on spinal and neural structures, reflexes on the face which aid in the movement of specific neural structures, as well as techniques to diminish blockage in spinal flow.  Using dynamic positioning during treatment allows for wider range results with immediate functional changes.

Class Prerequisites: Physical/Energetic Interface: Neuro 1, Biomechanical Regulators: Lower Extremities and Circulation 1

 

1)       Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate the ability to:

2)       Feel the relationship between a neural structure and a reflex point that affects its motility;

3)       Feel the criss-cross flow over the spine and determine where there are blocked points;

4)       Locate reflexes which assist flow through blocked areas;

5)       Use positioning and reflexes to achieve greater spinal ROM;

6)       Locate and utilize vascular reflexes which enhance circulation of the environment of the spine.

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2 ½ hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

Review Neuro One

Lecture: Cranial anatomy; the sutures and tissues affecting their mobility

Lecture:  Reflex points which affect membranes at the sutures

Lab: Hand Skills

Lab: Sutural reflexes

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (2 hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

Lecture: Dura and its innervation

Lecture review of dural techniques and dural technique with reflex points

Lab:  Dura

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2 hours lecture, 1 ½ hour lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Vascular reflexes for paraspinal tissue

Lecture: Vascular reflexes for tissues in the spine

Lecture:  Lymph reflexes for the spine

Lab: Vascular reflexes

Lunch  12:30 – 2:00

Day Two p.m.  2:00-5:00 (2 hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

Lecture: Spinal cord fibrosis research and implications

Lecture: Theories regarding treatment of spinal cord fibrosis

Lecture:  Use of reflexes to assist in treatment of fibrosis

Lab:  Locate and assist in treatment for fibrosis with reflexes

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2 hours lecture, 1 ½ hour lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Spinal tracts, efferent and afferent

Lab: Following energetic flow down the spine

Lecture:  Sacral reflexes

Lab: Sacral reflexes

Lecture: Enhancing flow, problem solving for influences

Lab: Enhancing flow

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1 ½ hour lecture 1 ½ hour lab)

Lecture: Cognitive Influences: shock and trauma

Lecture:  Cerebellum and current research

Lab: Cognitive Influences and Visceral Interactions

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Four: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1 ½ hour lecture 1 ½ hour lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Neural Structures and facial reflexes, topographical and depth location

Lab: Combining sacral and facial reflexes

Lecture: a protocol for assessment and treatment

Demo: Assessment and Treatment

Lunch 12:30- 2:00

Day Four: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1 hour lecture, 2 hour lab)

Lab: Assessment and treatment

Review, questions and answers/wrap up

 

Total:    14.5   hours theory and concepts, 11.5 hours lab and skills: 26 contact hours

 

 

Physical/Energetic Interface: Circulation (CIRC1) is a prerequisite for Physical/Energetic Interface: Neuro 2 and the Mentorship Program

26 credit hours. Students are exposed to the core system of the body, the circulatory system, which is connected with all of the other physiological systems. A dysfunction in any system can not be fully treated without involvement of the circulatory system. Circulation involves more than the heart and blood vessels. It includes the lymphatic system, the immune system and connective tissues. It has been found that the rhythms of the circulatory system provide stimulus for neural motilities. This course presents new ways to help with key mechanisms of circulation and can very quickly impact toxicity problems, digestive issues, musculoskeletal and neurological dysfunctions. These techniques rely upon the development of palpation skills and knowledge of anatomy. Practitioners must recognize and work with the intelligence of the body. Students are exposed to feeling what is trying to occur in the body and how to assist it. We consider this the most efficient and compassionate way to work, as it does not leave the client decompensated or depleted. This seminar features methods of interacting with the circulatory systems at physical, reflexive and energetic levels.

Class Prerequisites: Core Concepts and Manual Perception 1

Physical/Energetic Interface: Circulation is a Required Class for Neuro 2, Fluid Pressure Dynamics Visceral and Cranial and BMRLE.

Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Feel the main rhythms of the circulatory system, including pulmonary rhythms, portal rhythms, digestive and lymph rhythms;
  2. Locate key points which influence these rhythms;
  3. Find and assist the body areas through the connective tissue that effect these rhythms and processes.

OUTLINE

 Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:00

Lecture:  Introduction to circulation, demonstrations and Labs:  Rhythms

Lab:  Hand skills

Lecture: Right and Left side of Heart

Lunch 12:00-1:30

Day One:  p.m.1:30-5:00

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs:  Vasculature of the heart

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs: Pulmonary Circulation

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:00

Review, questions and answers

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs:  Liver/heart

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs:  Portal system, anatomy and considerations

Lunch:  12:00-1:30

Day Two:  p.m. 1:30-5:00

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs: Portal System Treatment

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs:  Kidney Hearty relationship

Lecture, Demonstrations and Labs: Augmentation utilizing rhythms and reflexes

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three:  a.m. 9:00-12:00

Review, questions and answers.

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Neurovascular reflexes: Main reflexes, spinal vessels, neural circulation

Lunch:  12:00-1:30

Day Three:  p.m. 1:30-5:00

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Neurovascular reflexes- specific tissues

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Applying neurovascular reflexes to portal and pulmonary system treatment.

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Four:  a.m. 9:00-12:00

Review, questions and answers

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Conductivity as concept

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Locating AV/SA nodes and following impulses

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Lymphatic system

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Anatomy and palpation

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  Cisterna chyli and lymphatic ducts

Lab:  Integration of morning labs

Lunch:  12:00-1:30

Day Four:  p.m. 1:30-5:00

Lecture and Demonstrations:  Energetic Aspects

Lab:  Process Centers/Heart Fulcra

Lecture, Demonstrations and Lab:  General treatment considerations

Lab:  Comprehensive Assessment and treatment

Review, questions and answers

 

Total: 15.5 hours theory and concepts, 9.5 hours lab and skills: 26 contact hours

 

Fluid Pressure Dynamics Series: This is some of the most basic as well as the most sophisticated work of Frank Lowen.  The development of these techniques led to the more complete understanding of other techniques including Biomechanical Regulators. The role of circulation and fluid systems is key to the workings and regulation of all other systems and learning ways to influence and assist these processes adds an incredible amount of efficiency and efficacy to all other treatments.

Fluid Pressure Dynamics Foundations

13 credit hours. Students of all levels are introduced to the basics of the Fluid Pressure Dynamics and taught techniques which can be easily applied to a wide range of clients.  Students will learn how to engage the main reflexes and rhythms, as well as how to engage with other vascular reflexes to effect rapid tissue changes.  Treatment areas for this class include the spine, scapulas, hips, knees, ankles and shoulders.

Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate the ability to:

1)       Feel the main rhythm for arterial and venous phases.

2)       Utilize reflexes to assist joint mobility in open or closed phases.

3)     Determine which vascular phase to use for a given tissue restriction.

 

Prerequisites: None, Core Concepts and Skills recommended.

Fluid Pressure Dynamics Foundations: is a prerequisite for Fluid Pressure Dynamics: Cranial and Fluid Pressure Dynamics: Visceral.

FLUID PRESSURE DYNAMICS

Outline Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Lecture:  Introduction and overview

Lecture:  Theory of Lowen Systems

Lab:  Hand Skills- engaging

Break

Lecture: Introduction to Fluid Pressure Dynamics

Lecture and Lab: Main Heart Rhythm

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00- 5:00 (1.0 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture and Demonstration; Biomechanics of gait in relationship to filling and emptying

Lecture and Lab: Spinal Curves with Fluid Pressure Dynamics.

Break

Lecture and Lab: Treatment of the Scapula and Shoulder with Fluid Pressure Dynamics

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Biomechanics of the hip and pelvis in relationship to filling and emptying

Demo and Lab: Treatment of the hip- anterior and posterior glide.

 

Lecture: Biomechanics of the knee in relation to Fluid Pressure Dynamics

Demo and Lab: Treatment of the cruciates and patella with FPD and positioning

Day Two: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

Lecture Demo and Lab: Open and closed facets. Dynamics of weight bearing and fluid pressure for treatment.

Guided Lab: Spinal curves and weight bearing.

Lecture: Dynamics of the foot and ankle.  Anatomy and nomenclature.

Demo and Lab: Treating the talus in filling and emptying phases.

Lecture: Integration and treatment considerations.

Questions and Answers.

 

13 contact hours including 6 hours lecture and demonstration and 7 hours of lab

 

 

DESCRIPTION FOR CHANNELS AND BRIDGES

Channels and Bridges is the introductory class which teaches the latest concepts within the Fluid Pressure Dynamics Model. Building on the models that biomechanics are interrelated with the phases of circulation, and that there are direct correlations between different parts of the body linked to responses during weight-bearing, a more detailed strategy to assessment and treatment is explained and explored.

Channels are pathways that can be palpated from the surface of the body, which have flow patterns in both directions corresponding to venous and arterial phases.  Bridges are the transverse structures which communicate between different structures and layers.  We also refer to zones, which indicate where in the body are areas which require treatment.

Channels and Bridges provides an understanding of how the body integrates information between physiological and biomechanical changes in the body and a method to help the body make corrections and adapt to these changes.

Absolute prerequisites for this class are Core Concepts and Skills, Essential Elements 1 (or Manual Perception 1, Biomechanical Regulators and Connective Tissues Regulators Foundations) and Fluid Pressure Dynamics Foundations.

 

 

OUTLINE FOR CHANNELS AND BRIDGES

 

Day One: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3.0 hours theory, .5 hours lab)

•             Lecture: Introduction and overview. Definition of Channels and Bridges.

•             Lecture: Review of required readings- Alfred Pischinger book.

•             Demonstration: Preview of Treatment

•             Break

•             Lecture and Palpation Lab: Arterial and Venous rhythms as palpated from diaphragm.            Using these rhythms as main references. Activation of intrinsics during phases of movement; weight bearing and non-weight-bearing.

•             Lunch 12:30-2:00

 

Day One: p.m. 2:00 – 5:00 (1.0 hours theory, 2 hours lab)

•             Lecture: Organization of the Channels. Repeated patterns throughout the body.

•             Lab: Location of channels and zones.

•             Break

•             Lecture and Demonstration: Assessment using the zones and anterior lines (channels).

•             Practice Lab: Basic assessment from anterior.

•             Review, questions and answers

Day Two: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2.0 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab)

•             Review, questions and answers

•             Lecture, Demonstration and Lab: The foot and relationships to the rest of body. Posterior channels.

•             Lab: Location of posterior channels.

•             Lecture and Lab: Anatomy of pelvic and sacral ligaments. Biomechanical review of pelvis/sacrum.

•             Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Two: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1.0 hour theory, 2 hours lab)

•             Lecture and Demo: Treatment using Channels 1-3- treating Sacroiliac joint, sacrotuberous ligaments, ilio lumbar ligaments, sacrospinalis ligament.

•             Lab: Treatment using Channels 1-3.

•             Break

•             Lecture and Demonstration: Posterior Channel 4 and Channel 5, femoral glide and fibula.

•             Lab: Treatment of femur and fibula.

•             Demo and Lab: Evaluation using zone in thorax, finding involved channels and treating related tensions using this system

•             Review, questions and answers.  Application to practice.

 

13 CEU’s.  7 hours lecture, 6 hours lab.

 

 

 

Fluid Pressure Dynamics: Visceral (formally Visceral Dynamics)

26 Credit Hours. Fluid Pressure Dynamics: Visceral is an innovative approach to the evaluation and treatment of the connective tissue within and connecting the contents of the body cavities and their effect on movement and biomechanics.  Body rhythms involving the circulatory system are utilized to effect pressure changes which are part of our natural process to regulate our daily body functions.

Techniques for the hard frame and soft tissue are included, allowing sustained changes in all body cavities.  This is a powerful addition to other forms of Visceral techniques.

This is very safe and gentle, but very powerful, making both large and subtle changes.  This will impact range of motion, pain levels and function and can be applied to all client populations

 

 

Prerequisites: Core Concepts and Skills, Manual Perception 1,  Circulation 1, Fluid Pressure Dynamics Foundations, Visceral Foundations (or background in Visceral Manipulation)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:  Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

1.  Palpate and contribute to the circulatory rhythms in filling and emptying phases

2.  Engage and utilize the main heart rhythm to effect a change in the mobility and motility of viscera

3.  Identify which cycle needs to be treated depending upon the patterns of restrictions.

4.  Use positioning and reflexes to augment treatment results.

5.  Assess the relationship of viscera with phases of gait or biomechanical problems.

 

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3 ½ hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

 

Lecture: New Theory of Fluid Pressure Dynamics- as applied to the Viscera

Lecture:  Visceral anatomy and biomechanics.

Lecture: Phases of Movement-  filling and emptying.

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (2 hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

Lecture: Thorax- hard frame

Lab: Thorax- hard frame

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1 1/2 hours lecture, 2 hour lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Vasculature of the thorax

Lecture: More Fluid Pressure Theory

Lecture and lab:  Fluid Pressure Dynamics for vascular of thorax

Lunch  12:30 – 2:00

Day Two p.m.  2:00-5:00 (2 hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

Lecture: Anatomy of the lungs and their connective tissue.

Lab: Treatment of Pulmonary Dynamics

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2 hours lecture, 1 ½ hour lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Anatomy of the abdomen. Visceral Dynamics of the abdomen.

Lecture and lab: Treatment of the liver.

Lecture and lab: Treatment of the stomach

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1 ½ hour lecture 1 ½ hour lab)

Lecture: Dynamics of the Gall Bladder, Duodenum and Pancreas,

Lecture and lab: treatment of upper G.I. area  with Fluid Pressure Dynamics

Lecture:  Small Intestine and Colon Anatomy, connective tissue and vasculature

Lab: Treatment of Lower GI with Fluid Pressure Dynamics

Concurrent Lecture and Lab: Biomechanical Considerations during gait cycle.

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Four: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1 ½ hour lecture 1 ½ hour lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Kidneys- anatomy and considerations

Lab: Kidneys with Fluid Pressure Dynamics

Lecture: Dynamics of the Pelvis integrated with biomechanics

Lab: Pelvic Treatment with Fluid Pressure Dynamics

 

Lunch 12:30- 2:00

Day Four: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1 hour lecture, 2 hour lab)

Lecture: Integrated Evaluation

Demonstration : Assessment and Treatment.

Lab: Integrated Treatment

Review, questions and answers/wrap up

Total:    14.5   hours theory and concepts, 11.5 hours lab and skills: 26 contact hours

 

Fluid Pressure Dynamics: Cranial

Fluid Pressure Dynamics: Cranial teaches a new, profoundly effective approach to assessing and treating the dynamics of the system that includes and connects the cranium and the sacrum via the circulation and gentle pressures which are part of this system.  Relationship between the dynamics of the cranial rhythmic impulse and this system are explored.

This class includes review of cranial bone anatomy and movement, and ways to interact with the specific tissues including bone, sutures, dura, and membranes, and using the techniques to improve the inherent movements of this system.  Sacral and basic spinal mechanics are also covered.

It is vital to have a working knowledge of the material from Neuro 1 and Circulation before taking this class.

 

Prerequisites: Core Concepts and Skills, Fluid Pressure Dynamics Foundations, Manual Perception 1  Circulation, Neuro 1.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:  Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

1.  Palpate the Cranial Rhythmic Impulse and the Vascular Rhythm of the cranium.

2.  Engage and utilize the main heart rhythm to effect a change in range of motion.

3.  Identify which phase of a cranial rhythm is restricted.

4.  Use positioning and reflexes to achieve greater spinal Range of Motion

5.  Locate and utilize vascular reflexes which enhance circulation of the environment of the spine and brain.

 

Please note that while time adds up to 26 hours, there are 5 minute a.m. and p.m. breaks.  The breakdown here is a guideline.  Some groups prefer to have longer breaks and shorter lunches, depending on proximity of eating establishments.  Some groups prefer the option of an early start and/or shorter lunch on the final day of the course to allow for travel time.

 

OUTLINE

Day One:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (3 ½ hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

 

Lecture: New Theory of Fluid Pressure Dynamics- basic concepts

Lecture:  Cranial Anatomy- bones

Lecture: Phases of Movement- Flexion and extension, filling and emptying.

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day One:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (2 hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

Lecture: Specific Movement during phases of flexion/extension

Lab: Using the movement from the heart area for flexion and extension.

Lab: Assessing and treating cranial movements with the heart rhythms.

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Two:  a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1 1/2 hours lecture, 2 hour lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Cranial Anatomy

Lecture: More Fluid Pressure Theory

Lecture:  Flat Bone Reflexes

Lab: Flat Bone Reflexes

Lunch  12:30 – 2:00

Day Two p.m.  2:00-5:00 (2 hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

Lecture: Spinal cord fibrosis research and implications

Lecture: Theories regarding treatment of spinal cord fibrosis

Lecture:  Use of Trigeminal Nerve and recurrent Meningeal nerve  to effect dura

Lab:  Dural Techniques

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Three: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (2 hours lecture, 1 ½ hour lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Cranial Sutures, technique review

Lab: Reflexes for suture treatment

Lecture:  Meninges of cranium and spine

Lab: Posterior head reflexes for dura of cord and nerve roots

Lunch 12:30-2:00

Day Three:  p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1 ½ hour lecture 1 ½ hour lab)

Lecture: Anatomy of vasculature of cranium and spine

Lecture:  Neurovascular reflexes

Lab: Inion Reflex, treatment of Spinal Arteries and Veins

Concurrent Lecture and Lab: Biomechanical Considerations during gait cycle.

Review, questions and answers

 

Day Four: a.m. 9:00-12:30 (1 ½ hour lecture 1 ½ hour lab)

Review, questions and answers

Lecture: Sacral Mechanics

Lab : Sacral Treatment

Lecture: Spinal Restrictions with Fluid Dynamic Approach

Lab: Spinal Corrections

Lunch 12:30- 2:00

Day Four: p.m. 2:00-5:00 (1 hour lecture, 2 hour lab)

Lecture: Advanced Cranial Techniques

Lab: Integration of Cranial Techniques

Review, questions and answers/wrap up

Total:    14.5   hours theory and concepts, 11.5 hours lab and skills: 26 contact hours

 

Training Intensives

Purpose: The purpose and goals of this class vary greatly between classes, as students often have questions regarding client issues from their own practices or from their life experiences. This class was designed to place students in an immersion-type of environment in which students interact with Frank Lowen in small groups for extended periods of time, improving their understanding of the work, learning newer and better techniques, developing better hand skills and creating relationships among themselves which foster growth of their full potential as individuals and practitioners.

Prerequisites: At least several DMI classes including Fluid Pressure Dynamics Visceral or Cranial.

Learning Outcomes:

1)       Student will be exposed to the latest techniques in Lowen Systems.

2)       Students will receive feedback on their engagement and treatment techniques from Frank and peers

3)       Students will set personal goals regarding their goals in these trainings.

4 day classes, immersion program.  Classes may exceed the typical seminar hours and include a variety of experiences depending upon the group and goals.

Illuminatis/Lowen Systems ( Provider Number P3337) is recognized by the Board of Certification, Inc. to offer continuing education (CE) for Certified Athletic Trainers